Enhanced metabolite yield with compensatory biomass reduction revealed by moisture stress induction in Centella asiatica (L.)

Authors

  • M R Rohini ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India Author
  • V K Rao ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India Author
  • B Sreenu ICAR- Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India Author
  • G R Smitha ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India Author
  • G Sridhar ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India Author

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.24154/jhs.v19i1.2460

Keywords:

Centella asiatica, moisture stres, water use efficiency, triterpenoid content

Abstract

The exposure to any kind of stress tends to accelerate the secondary metabolism in medicinal plants increasing the production of secondary metabolites. The present investigation was undertaken to study the effect of moisture stress (100, 75, 50, 25 and 10% pot capacity) and control (as without plant) on growth, yield and metabolite content of Centella asiatica var. ‘Arka Prabhavi’, for two growing seasons under polyhouse conditions. Results revealed that moisture stress treatments had a significant effect on all observed growth and yield traits. Plants maintained at 100% PC exhibited luxurious vegetative growth with maximum leaf length (6.28 cm), leaf breadth (8.14 cm), petiole length (22.32 cm) and fresh biomass yield (164 g/pot). Cumulative water transpired and water use efficiency of the plants was also observed to be maximum at 100% PC. In contrary to biomass yield, increased asiaticoside (1.864%, 1.892%), madecassoside (2.856%, 3.382%) and total triterpenoid content (5.356%, 5.578%) at higher moisture stress levels of 75% and 50% PC, respectively, was observed. Hence, it is appropriate to grow Centella either at 100% or 75% PC to get optimum biomass and metabolite yield on a commercial scale.

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Author Biographies

  • M R Rohini, ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

    Scientist, Division of Flower and Medicinal Crops, ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

  • V K Rao, ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

    Division of Basic Sciences, ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

  • B Sreenu, ICAR- Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

    Division of Basic Sciences
    ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

  • G R Smitha, ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

    Division of Flower and Medicinal Crops, ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

  • G Sridhar, ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

    Division of Basic Sciences
    ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru - 560089, India

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Published

30-06-2024

How to Cite

M R, R., V K, R., Banoth, S., G R, S., & Gutam, S. (2024). Enhanced metabolite yield with compensatory biomass reduction revealed by moisture stress induction in Centella asiatica (L.). Journal of Horticultural Sciences, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.24154/jhs.v19i1.2460

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